women to urinate for us to drink to stay alive

women to urinate for us to drink to stay alive

Twenty two years after walking through the valley of the shadow of death, in search of greener pastures, Stephen Onyekamma has remained terrified. Unlike those who by faith would confess they fear no evil when confronted with such pangs of death, reliving of his experience still sends shivers down the spines of Onyekamma.

As he narrated his experience in the sahara desert , Onyekamma would intermittently pause out of traumatic effect and in thanksgiving to God for sparing his life. Initially, he was reluctant about recounting the experience, as he insisted it was one he wouldn’t want to remember. But upon insistence by our correspondent, Onyekamma buckled. women to urinate for us to drink to stay alive

Six years after graduating from the Imo State University (IMSU), and after failed attempts to secure a job, Onyekamma decided to get out of Nigeria. That was in 1999. The graduate of Political Science had Italy as his destination country. Rather than following the right process of seeking visa into the European destination, he opted to go through the desert.

From Owerri, Onyekamma moved to Kebbi State and from Kebbi to Niger Republic. According to him, Niger Republic was a converging ground for those seeking to smuggle themselves into Europe through the desert. Unfortunately for the young graduate, he arrived Niger Republic in 1999 at a time he said the country was thrown into turmoil due to a coup d’ etat in which the country’s president was killed. Though he said he was aware of the coup, that however, could not deter him as he was desperate to hit the deadly desert. Waiting for the political unrest in Niger to subside could be a dream killer for him. Onyekamma therefore, resolved to weather the storm.

“After my graduation, I searched for job but couldn’t get. After six years, I decided to travel to Europe through the desert. My plan was to get to Libya, work a little and then move through the Mediterranean Sea to Italy.

“Before I left in 1999, I knew there was a coup in Niger, but I couldn’t wait, since I had already made up my mind to travel”.

After about two weeks in the desert, Onyekamma finally arrived Libya. At the North African country, he went for training on vehicle alignment, and was able to master it within a short time. With the job, he could raise money to feed. But he was overcome by the sight of the terrifying Mediterranean Sea. He therefore, decided to go through the desert again to return to Nigeria, rather than heading to Italy.

“When I saw the boat they use in conveying people to Europe and the rampaging Mediterranean Sea, I became terrified and decided to return to Nigeria. I felt it was more dangerous stepping on the sea, than  returning to the desert. That was how I returned to Nigeria in 2005”.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *